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British Grand Prix

The race celebrating 70 years of F1: Verstappen ascended the throne

Max Verstappen was the winner, which put an end to the Mercedes team’s absolute winning record during the past four races.

Normally, Hamilton was always confident in his ability to win at his hometown after winning his first race at Silverstone a week before. After all, there was no second consecutive victory for him right back home.

Again, the tire problem made Hamilton and Mercedes struggling

In this F1 race, the Mercedes team could not find a solution to solving the tire condition on both Hamilton and Bottas’s cars. That problem caused Bottas to lose his place in the podium in the last few rounds, while Hamilton had to maneuver the car in fear and finish in a tattered tire situation.

The majority of drivers, which include Verstappen, have switched to hard tires to adapt to hot weather in British races. However, the Hamilton-Bottas duo chose the medium tire to start the race. Things did not support the Mercedes racing team when Bottas and Hamilton had a tire problem in turn.

On the other side, that was good news for Verstappen, as the young Dutch driver believed in using hard tires right from the start. He continuously widened the gap with the Bottas-Hamilton duo.

Mercedes of course did not give up. They accept that Bottas is behind Verstappen, but still bet that Hamilton can use all his talents to keep the top with a one-time pit strategy after the Dutch racer enters the pit for the second time.

After all, that calculation of the German team failed when Hamilton was forced to enter the pit for the second time after witnessing the gap with Verstappen gradually decreasing to the threshold of 8 seconds. From that moment on, the 35-year-old understood that a place in the podium was what he could aim for, rather than towards winning his fifth of the last six races at Silverstone.

The first win of Verstappen at the Silverstone track helped him take Bottas’ second place on the individual rankings.

It is still too early to talk about the possibility of Verstappen taking the throne of Hamilton when F1 this season only goes through the fifth stage. However, Verstappen and Red Bull were expected to prevent Mercedes from turning the F1 race into a solo playing field like last season.

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F1 racing

On average, how many races does it take in an F1 season?

The number of races varies from year to year depending on the races contracted with the F1 organizers to conduct a race in that particular season. Since 2016, F1 has reached the milestone of 21 races, more than the season of previous decades. In the 2000 season only 17 races took place from the track in Australia on 12/3 to the last race in Malaysia on 22/10.

But at that time, moving a long distance between one race to another was quite easy, so the F1 schedule was quite similar to today. In the previous decades, F1 had many major racing courses in Europe and there were races on the other side of the world, so the schedule was quite time consuming. In 1970, nine of the 13 racing venues were in Europe. Even in the 1950s and 60s, most seasons were only 10 or less than 10 races.

Which F1 season has the most races?

If everything goes as planned, 2020 will be the year with the most races in F1 history. Adding two new racetracks in the Netherlands, the F1 2020 calendar has 22 races, a record schedule. But the current situation shows that the plan has been disgraced, so the seasons 2016, 2018 and 2019 are the seasons that hold the most races, with 21 races in each season.

Which F1 season has the least number of races?

The first official F1 Championship in 1950 had only seven official races, although an additional 18 unofficial races were held throughout the year. These are the summer event races, which start at Silverstone on May 13 and end at Monza on September 3.

Unofficial races also include a trip to the Indianapolis 500, which is seen as a championship round, along with races at Monte Carlo, Spa, Reims and Bremgarten in Switzerland.