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Racing in the UK

Pure ETCR opens new chapter in electric car racing (part 1)

Promoted by Eurosport Events, the Discovery-owned promoter behind the WTCR – FIA World phaeton Cup and FIM Endurance World Championship, Pure ETCR promises the exhilarating battles and can unlock the incredible potential of high-performance electric vehicles.

Pure ETCR brings together the spirit of on-track competition in its purest sense and therefore the world’s most powerful touring cars to make electrifying on-track battles which will thrill motorsport fans and supply a brand-new platform for the most important automotive manufacturers to showcase their latest electric production cars within the intense environment of the racetrack.

REVOLUTIONARY PHAETON RACE FORMAT

A live draw will split the PURE ETCR field into Battle groups with drivers from an equivalent manufacturer deliberately kept apart for Battle 1. Cars will start side-by-side with the first-drawn driver having the first choice on where to line up.

Winners reach the highest groups of Battle 2 with runners-up squaring-up against one another and therefore the remaining drivers doing an equivalent. All Battle 2 winners reach the Grand Final with runners-up within the B Final and therefore the remaining drivers within the C Final.

An increasing number of points are awarded at every stage except Battle 3; a single-car, all-or-nothing blast over one lap to work out who gets the first choice of starting position in each final. The Grand Final winner is that the event King or Queen and can automatically be the highest points-scorer for the round.

KEY INNOVATIONS AT the guts OF THE SERIES

Uniquely among circuit-racing championships, cars will line-up side-by-side for every Battle, inside an enormous starting stall, which can become one among the centerpieces of the series. When the lights leave, the gate will open and it’s time for full-throttle action. Once released, every driver will have one use of a ‘push-to-pass’ facility, unleashing extra energy and power to offer them an opportunity to overtake the car ahead.

Drivers and teams will steel themselves against Battle within the ‘Hot Zone’ – a connected area where they will watch the action unfold on the track as their team-mates battle for brand honors. Then they head straight to their cars within the starting gates, ensuring an ultra-fast turnover between Battles.

After crossing the finishing line, cars are taken to the Energy Station; the center of an interactive zone within the middle of the paddock, where fans can watch the vehicles re-energizing up-close in a safe and interesting environment.

Categories
Racing in the UK

British motorsport in 2019 headlines

Although Formula 1, the World Rally Championship, and the British Touring Car Championship take the sport’s limelight, they account for only 40 of the 30,000 competition licence holders in the UK. Competitive motorsport alomost takes place every weekend of the year.

In fact, the 2019 season of motorsport has been a mixed affair with external pressures heavily weighing on the sport and the ability of the participants to commit their time and money to it remaining a key factor. The groundswell of opinion against noise, safety, fossil fuels, litigation concerns, a shortage of volunteer officials, and even Brexit uncertainty have somehow impacted the sport.

However, motorsport continues to deliver excitement and enjoyment to thousands of people. The year 2019 has provided several delighting success stories right across the sport.

In racing, proper low-cost competition has thrived. The new Citroën C1 Challenge at Silverstone broke all records with a total of 100 cars and 500 drivers for a 24-hour marathon. Dozens of novices appeared in the near-standard cars with an awful lot of damaged cars after 24 hours. Unluckily, a second round-the-clock marathon that was planned for Anglesey in September had to be binned because of a dire shortage of marshals.

Meanwhile, the Classic Sports Car Club get a strong pace with its winning formula of longer races to cover just about any car. The CSCC was flying when the traditional racing clubs such as the British Racing and Sports Car Club or the British Automobile Racing Club were feeling the pinch.

Away from racing, national-level forest rallying also had an average year when the cost of competing reached at an alarming rate. The recent Roger Albert Clark Rally pointed out that many crews are now searching for a longer-distance adventure than the traditional 45-stage-mile events in one day.

The real rallying expansion was in the growing number of special stages that ran on closed public roads. There are six events that have been run since the relevant mainland laws of the UK were changed and competitors have queued up in order to tackle special stage rallying in the lanes.

The motorsport events had another strong season in both hillclimbs and sprints. The big venues such as Prescott and Shelsley Walsh frequently draw overflowing entries and a lot of them come from newcomers. Competitive timed motorsport doesn’t come any accessible or cheaper than this.